Vital Visions: The Vedala Brothers Podcast

6: A Conversation with Colleagues

September 21, 2023 Norman Regional Health System Season 1 Episode 6
Vital Visions: The Vedala Brothers Podcast
6: A Conversation with Colleagues
Show Notes Transcript

Jay Jennings, MD and Aaron Smathers, MD join the Vedalas this week to talk about their experiences together in medical school at OU and now at Norman Regional. The four physicians look back and reminisce on their days spent in lectures and anatomy lab and the professors who helped them get to where they are now. Dr. Jennings and Dr. Smathers share about their lives and specialties, giving patients and physicians tips and advice. We get to learn more about the process of medical school and what it took to get through their classes on this week’s episode, A Conversation with Colleagues!
 
Guest Bios:
Jay Jennings, MD, is a general surgeon with Norman Regional’s Oklahoma Surgical Associates clinic. Dr. Jennings attended medical school at the University of Oklahoma and completed his general surgery residency at the University of Missouri. He pursued general surgery as his field of medicine because of his desire to improve patient’s lives in a direct manner. He enjoys having the ability to not only figure out problems for patients but also fix them in a holistic approach. Dr. Jennings said his patients can expect a provider with a strong technical skill set who is fully invested in providing them the best individualized care possible.

His special interests include bowel blockages, colon cancer, diverticular disease, emergency general surgery, hernia repair, laparoscopic appendectomies, laparoscopic and open gallbladder surgery and robotic surgery.

Dr. Jennings is a sixth generation Oklahoman with strong native ties. Most of his family has dedicated their lives to serving the citizens of Oklahoma in a variety of ways. Dr. Jennings says he is honored to continue this tradition as a surgeon.

Aaron Smathers, MD, MS, is a board-certified sports medicine physician at Ortho Central. He attended medical school at the University of Oklahoma College Of Medicine and chose to pursue sports medicine because as an athlete himself, he wants to help other athletes overcome the challenges associated with competition. Dr. Smathers said his patients can expect a well-rounded sports medicine physician prepared to take care of any and all active populations. The focus will always be to work together to achieve a patient’s goals.

His special interests include non-operative orthopedic care for all ages, endurance sports performance and preparation, ultrasound guided joint and soft tissue injections, non-operative fracture care, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections and concussion management.

Dr. Smathers enjoys spending time with family, biking, and playing the guitar.

Links:
Jay Jennings, MD
Aaron Smathers, MD
Dr. Jennings’ Clinic, Oklahoma Surgical Associates
Dr. Smathers’ Clinic, Ortho Central
Blog – Prevent Commotio Cordis in Young Athletes

This podcast is for educational purposes only. The information in this show is not to be used as medical advice. If you are needing medical care, please consult with your physician.

Norman Regional is hiring! See all our open opportunities here:
https://careers.normanregional.com/careers-home/

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Welcome, friends.

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This is Dr’s Krishna and Veer Vedala.

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And we are the Vedala Bros.

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We are delighted to bring you
our brand new podcast, Vital Visions.

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So in this podcast, we'll be discussing
important medical topics

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that affect your community.

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We'll be looking into medical research
Health and wellness tips

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and also available health

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care resources brought to you
by the Norman Regional Health System.

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That's right.

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And in each episode, we'll also be joined
by medical professionals,

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local community leaders
and even some of our friendly neighbors

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as we talk through various issues
that are affecting our community.

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So if you want to lead healthy lives
or learn about the new healthy trends,

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we want this podcast to be your
go to resource.

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Welcome back,

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folks, to another episode of Vital Visions
with the Vedala Brothers.

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We say Norman Regional is a great place
to work and we really mean it.

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And it's because we get to work
with our close friends

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who we went to medical school together.

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And so, without further ado,
our very special guests today, Krishna

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do you want to introduce them? Yeah.

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So today we have, uh, Dr.

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Jay Jennings, uh, one of our general
surgeons, uh, and also, uh, Dr.

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Aaron Smathers, who's one of our wonderful
sports medicine doctors.

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And so glad guys,
we're glad to see you guys again

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and glad you could come on our podcast
and we're thrilled.

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So thanks for having me
today. Excited to be here.

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Happy to be here.

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Yeah, it's really nice.

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We can, you know,
I mean, this is about our old med school.

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Yeah. Yeah.

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Sometimes I try to forget
about those days, but that's okay.

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That's all right.

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If you if you share a traumatic experience
together, it creates a bond

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I hear. It really does.

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Do you guys mind
uh, sharing a little bit about yourself.

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[Dr. Jay Jennings]: Yeah, So

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I just moved back to Norman Regional
about six months ago.

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I finished my residency
training up in Columbia, Missouri.

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I was born and raised here in Oklahoma
from Checotah

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originally and then did my undergrad
in medical school here at O.U.

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So my wife and I knew
once we went to residency

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five years ago,
my plan was always to come back.

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And so I'm really happy to be back around

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family and,
you know, all the people in Oklahoma

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that helped me get to where I am
today. So.

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[Dr. Aaron Smathers]: Yeah, and for myself,
I mean, a long way around.

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But I grew up in Moore,
so I've been here my whole life.

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I lived in Norman
while I went to undergrad

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and graduate school

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and spent a lot of time down here
in Norman, so I was familiar with Norman

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Regional and and the Norman population,
everything around here in the Metro.

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So whenever I, I went kind of
a long way around to med school

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after I had a different career
and things like that,

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but knew that I wanted to stay around here
because I had been in the sports world

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so much and decided to stay here
and take care of the people that I had,

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you know,
help me get in and things like that

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and met all along the way in the sports
that I was in.

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So, you know, my family's here.

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We've had roots here, so this makes sense.

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Yeah. That's amazing guys.

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Like, um, being from Oklahoma
and being able

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to give back to the community
that kind of helped raise this kind of.

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I think we have all have
shared experiences.

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regarding that aspect.

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Yeah, I think one of the things is,
is, uh, growing up in one place,

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you know, going to school, one place,
no matter where you go like Jay,

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going to Missouri, um, you know,
you always want to come back, right?

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Uh, there's just something
about the joy of being familiar

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with the place,
and I think that's really the calling

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for a lot of us
to come back and, and practice here.

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Uh, but,

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uh, the thing is, is, uh, what was it like
growing up in Oklahoma for you guys?

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Well, I

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mean, I grew up in a small town
and my family has a ranch, so I was,

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you know, I was always used to manual
labor growing up.

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So I, everybody's
always got that small town vibe

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and everybody cares about you
and knows about you and willing to

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really do anything they could
to help you get to where you are.

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And so it's just like, that's kind of
what it was like for my whole life.

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And then,

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you know, even moving to college, for me,
it's like moving to the big city.

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When you moved to Norman
just from Checotah to

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but I've gotten used to it now.

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And everybody really, wherever you go in
Oklahoma is always there

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and supportive for you.

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So, I mean, I was always ready to
come back and just be around those people.

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Yeah.

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And for me, growing up in Moore,

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you know, when I grew up there, it was
quite different than what it is now.

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There is a lot more people
that live in Moore.

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And so I was actually born and we lived in
Midwest City for a couple of years

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and then moved to Moore
when the original Walmart was there.

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There was a Sam's Club.

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Eventually, right know, it was very small
compared to what it is now,

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and it was kind of a small town feel
in between a Norman and an Oklahoma City.

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And so it had that vibe
when I was growing up,

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you know, it seemed just a little bit
in the middle, but it seemed like

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it was a little bit
more rural or small town.

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So now it's quite different.

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But I don't live in Moore anymore.

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I'm in West OKC, but, uh, you know,
still have roots and ties back there.

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I met a friend the other day.

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I was covering some volleyball

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at my daughter's game
and one of the guys that I went to junior

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high and high school with
is a police detective up there, was there

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and we reminisced
about all the old days back in Moore.

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So that's what we still have
that all the time.

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I run into people that I knew
or I grew up with, right?

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Yeah. I mean, even we're from Edmond.

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Yeah, Edmond.

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Growing up, it was like nothing there.

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When we were growing up
and now it's. It's completely different.

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I don't want to drive through it. Yeah.

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It's a 

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it's a 20 minute drive from one side
to the other north to east or north or south

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or east to west.

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So it's just, uh, the city
as a whole has grown and all the suburbs.

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And so it's,
uh, it's always kind of fun, kind of just

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looking at the ground and looking back
and saying, oh, wow, this place has grown,

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but sometimes that can all be a little bit
tedious with, you know, the traffic. And.

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Um, so
guys, you know, being a general surgeon

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and sports med doctor, like what
inspired you to go into your field?

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And, uh.

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I mean, I was pretty fortunate
actually early on.

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And in high school I actually decided
I wanted to go to medical school.

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I had a family member
that was sick and, you know, spent

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a lot of time around doctors
and things like that.

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And just seeing how much they helped
my family,

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I knew that was something
that I kind of wanted to do.

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And then when I was in undergrad,
I got a summer job

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actually working at a community hospital
in Muskogee and got,

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you know, first assist and kind of help
get people ready for surgery.

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So that's kind of where I fell in love
with General surgery at that point

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and then really picked that early on
before I ever went to medical school

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and just kind of stuck with it
the whole way through

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and really glad I did.

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It's been really rewarding

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just, you know, even now just getting done
with residency, but getting to get out

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and take care of people with the surgery
standpoint has been great for me.

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That's awesome.

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And similar, You know, I think I from a
young age, I knew I wanted to be a doctor.

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At the time I didn't know,
but I was always an athlete.

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I was just naturally talented.

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I was fast. I could do a lot of athletics.

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So I played lots of sports growing up,
you know, I had injuries as well.

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And so as I went through the different
sports and had different injuries,

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you know, being taken care
of by different, uh, physicians, you know,

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I had a cardiology problem
when I was born,

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so I saw the same cardiologist
and they helped me and allowed me

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to play sports, which is nice, yeah,
It could have limited me and I did

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okay. so, um, kind of a give back to that.

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And then just

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I love sports medicine
because I get to treat young people

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that are athletic, keeps me
fresh and keeps me in the game, right?

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I also treat older individuals
that still play sports or that are active.

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So it's got a broad definition
of what is sports medicine.

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It's not just athletes,

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it's active individuals,
you know, keeping them healthy.

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So yeah.

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That's kind of the main point for me.

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For sports medicine. Yeah,

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that's awesome,

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guys, Thanks for sharing.

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Well, you know, since we all went
to medical school together,

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uh, uh, we were just wondering
if you could, uh, tell was, like,

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a memorable, memorable experience,
uh, during medical school.

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Where to begin?

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I mean, I guess the first thing comes to
mind is just the anatomy classes.

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Right off the bat, you're like,

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I guess I didn't really picture that going
into medicine being the first class

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that we were going to take
and dive right into that.

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It was pretty eye opening and like,
I think just starting out there like

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was an eye opener

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for how much you're going
to have to learn right off the bat and to

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keep going through with medical school.

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But it was a good way to start
because I really enjoyed that

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since I knew I wanted to do surgery.

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And I remember spending a lot of time
down there working with cadavers.

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And those were good experiences
with classmates for sure. Mhm.

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Yeah.

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Um, on the thing of 
classmates, you know, are mods

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that they put us in
I think was just a brilliant idea for when

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You have such a diverse population
coming in with different personalities,

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different ages, different backgrounds,
and then they kind of matched us up

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pretty well.

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So I think

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we were pretty close with our mods
and I think that was really important.

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You know, I was the senior of the class,
actually by just a few months.

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It was also.

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Um, well, Charlie Smith, he was in there.

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And then, um, you know, we had,
uh, Daniel Rowden, he was in with us.

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Um, Ben Nisson was in there.

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Oh, man. I wonder what

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Ben's doing now?

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Yeah, he's doing psychiatry.
Oh, wow. Yeah.

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Could never imagine.

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I never thought he would do psychiatry.

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Yeah,

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I think it drew him in.

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Yeah, I think we had a couple
of the youngest students

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in the in our class,
and then they had the oldest.

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Yeah, was Holly in your class? Yeah.

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Holly was in there. Yeah. Mm.

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Yeah. I remember.
She was one of the younger ones.

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Yeah. Yeah.

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So I thought that was kind of a neat
thing. Yeah.

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As we went through
kind of a little family that we had. So

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What mod were you in?

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I was in, I had like Shawnee and Quang

212
00:09:33,155 --> 00:09:35,255
and then I had, Jared and I lived together
in medical.

213
00:09:35,255 --> 00:09:36,854
School for three years

214
00:09:36,854 --> 00:09:37,554
Oh, nice.

215
00:09:37,554 --> 00:09:40,654
So he's actually in Alabama now
doing anesthesia, so.

216
00:09:40,721 --> 00:09:41,920
Oh sweet.

217
00:09:41,920 --> 00:09:44,553
But yeah, and I had Sama as well.

218
00:09:44,553 --> 00:09:46,786
Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. Husky.

219
00:09:46,786 --> 00:09:48,686
Yeah, we run with that all the time.

220
00:09:48,686 --> 00:09:52,152
Was Claire Atkinson in
one of your mods? Or? She was in my mod.

221
00:09:52,286 --> 00:09:52,519
Yeah.

222
00:09:52,519 --> 00:09:55,618
So she's now she's actually,
uh, doing allergy,

223
00:09:55,618 --> 00:09:58,085
I think, at the Oklahoma Allergy
and Asthma Clinic. Awesome

224
00:09:58,085 --> 00:10:00,684
I already sent to referrals to her.
Yeah.

225
00:10:00,684 --> 00:10:01,318
All right. Yeah.

226
00:10:01,318 --> 00:10:03,551
I mean, that was one of the things
that was so nice

227
00:10:03,551 --> 00:10:05,917
moving back is like, Hey, I know that guy.
I know that guy.

228
00:10:05,917 --> 00:10:07,317
And so it's easy to just reach out

229
00:10:07,317 --> 00:10:10,316
and call people
when you have questions or need help with something too.

230
00:10:10,316 --> 00:10:12,016
So yeah, it's really interesting.

231
00:10:12,016 --> 00:10:14,416
Like you just like
are looking at providers,

232
00:10:14,416 --> 00:10:16,016
at least in a primary care world,
like we're looking at

233
00:10:16,016 --> 00:10:18,349
places to refer to in like, like Victoria Bug.

234
00:10:18,349 --> 00:10:19,215
You guys remember her?

235
00:10:19,215 --> 00:10:20,082
Yeah, she's at Dean

236
00:10:20,082 --> 00:10:22,415
McGee so I referred a patient to her recently.

237
00:10:22,415 --> 00:10:24,881
Yeah, it's a, you notice it all the time.

238
00:10:24,881 --> 00:10:27,447
Like, my wife's due
to have our first baby in August,

239
00:10:27,447 --> 00:10:29,681
and we were looking through a list
of pediatricians and

240
00:10:29,681 --> 00:10:30,814
Andre Ruhlmann's on there.

241
00:10:30,814 --> 00:10:32,280
Oh, yeah, Andre's great.

242
00:10:32,280 --> 00:10:34,080
Yeah, that's right. Go to him. Right?
Yeah.

243
00:10:34,080 --> 00:10:36,313
It just makes choosing things like that
easier.

244
00:10:36,313 --> 00:10:38,679
So, yeah,
that's something that we're lucky to have.

245
00:10:38,679 --> 00:10:41,246
Like that,
uh, that experience and camaraderie.

246
00:10:41,246 --> 00:10:44,379
And it does make our job as primary care
physicians a lot easier

247
00:10:44,379 --> 00:10:47,378
because now we know, okay, well,
I'm familiar with this person

248
00:10:47,378 --> 00:10:50,411
and I know who he is
and I can reach out to him and yeah,

249
00:10:50,478 --> 00:10:52,711
you know, and,
and that makes it a lot more easier.

250
00:10:52,711 --> 00:10:56,244
And then also it makes it just, you know,
just having a sigh of relief, knowing,

251
00:10:56,244 --> 00:10:59,743
oh, we have you know, we know somebody
that can help us with the situation.

252
00:10:59,810 --> 00:11:01,443
And so it's it's been fantastic.

253
00:11:01,443 --> 00:11:04,442
Like, uh, when I first heard
or when I first when I first heard,

254
00:11:04,609 --> 00:11:08,209
I think they were touring me
at Ortho Central and then I saw you there.

255
00:11:08,309 --> 00:11:09,608
Yeah. I was like Aaron, no way.

256
00:11:09,608 --> 00:11:15,108
And then, and then Jay I think you came in
and saw our facility, our clinic.

257
00:11:15,174 --> 00:11:16,774
And then I was like,
No way, this is great.

258
00:11:16,774 --> 00:11:18,007
And this is, this is fantastic.

259
00:11:18,007 --> 00:11:21,240
So it's it's great just having you guys here.

260
00:11:21,307 --> 00:11:25,440
Um, is there anything you guys want
to tell your patients about, like,

261
00:11:25,440 --> 00:11:27,639
any type of medical tidbits about,
you know,

262
00:11:27,639 --> 00:11:29,772
a common illness that you guys treat?

263
00:11:29,772 --> 00:11:32,105
Yeah. Like what is the most common thing?
I guess. Yeah, I

264
00:11:32,105 --> 00:11:32,405
guess you guys,

265
00:11:32,405 --> 00:11:33,872
Uh probably the most common surgery

266
00:11:33,872 --> 00:11:36,605
that I do for sure is like gallbladder
removal.

267
00:11:36,605 --> 00:11:40,404
It's pretty much the most common thing
general surgery does,

268
00:11:40,404 --> 00:11:43,804
but we do a lot of other stuff,
hernias and stuff like that too.

269
00:11:43,804 --> 00:11:47,570
But I think the biggest thing, people
that come in with gallbladder issues

270
00:11:47,570 --> 00:11:49,336
that are getting out,
they're always worried,

271
00:11:49,336 --> 00:11:50,869
how am I going to live
without my gallbladder?

272
00:11:50,869 --> 00:11:51,903
What am I going to do now?

273
00:11:51,903 --> 00:11:53,769
But really, most of the time, it's

274
00:11:53,769 --> 00:11:55,869
not something
that you have to have to live,

275
00:11:55,869 --> 00:11:58,368
which is why we're able to take it out
as much as we do.

276
00:11:58,368 --> 00:12:00,235
And people are always concerned
they're going to have

277
00:12:00,235 --> 00:12:02,968
to make dietary changes
after they get their gallbladder out.

278
00:12:02,968 --> 00:12:03,968
But really, you don't

279
00:12:03,968 --> 00:12:07,601
you know, there's not a lot of evidence
that you really have to change your diet.

280
00:12:07,601 --> 00:12:08,500
Sometimes you notice

281
00:12:08,500 --> 00:12:11,500
you may have looser stools
or things like that for a while, but

282
00:12:11,533 --> 00:12:14,200
usually I tell people after a few months,
there's really no issues

283
00:12:14,200 --> 00:12:17,199
eating anything, so that people
are always surprised to hear that.

284
00:12:17,199 --> 00:12:18,132
I feel like.

285
00:12:18,132 --> 00:12:19,032
That's great info

286
00:12:19,032 --> 00:12:21,932
for our patients.
I get that question all the time too.

287
00:12:21,999 --> 00:12:23,198
Yeah. Yeah, Dr. Smathers? 

288
00:12:23,198 --> 00:12:23,432
You know,

289
00:12:23,432 --> 00:12:28,264
in sports medicine we see such a diverse
set of injury versus chronic things.

290
00:12:28,264 --> 00:12:31,597
But I think for a lot of people
we see a lot of ankle sprains.

291
00:12:31,631 --> 00:12:34,630
I think it's a pretty big thing
that we take care of.

292
00:12:34,664 --> 00:12:37,730
It's an initial injury that when they get
it, it's kind of devastating.

293
00:12:37,730 --> 00:12:41,029
They can't walk, their leg,
their ankle swells up like crazy,

294
00:12:41,129 --> 00:12:44,096
a lot of pain
associated with it and bruising.

295
00:12:44,096 --> 00:12:46,162
And we get them in
to make sure they have a fracture.

296
00:12:46,162 --> 00:12:47,062
If we treat it.

297
00:12:47,062 --> 00:12:47,862
If it's a fracture,

298
00:12:47,862 --> 00:12:51,395
we treat it as a fracture
and put people in a boot immobilize it.

299
00:12:51,461 --> 00:12:54,194
If we rule out a fracture,
then typically we get them walking on it

300
00:12:54,194 --> 00:12:54,827
with a brace

301
00:12:54,827 --> 00:12:56,761
and get some functional movement
going to get them

302
00:12:56,761 --> 00:12:58,727
back to what they want to do quicker.

303
00:12:58,727 --> 00:12:59,527
You know, sometimes they get

304
00:12:59,527 --> 00:13:03,193
put into a boot by an urgent care
and it kind of delays their return

305
00:13:03,260 --> 00:13:05,859
to play or activities
and things like that.

306
00:13:05,859 --> 00:13:07,992
So we have to fight stiffness.

307
00:13:07,992 --> 00:13:10,059
So that's a pretty big one
that we can take care of.

308
00:13:10,059 --> 00:13:13,292
And they don't need to see
any of our surgeons for that stuff.

309
00:13:13,292 --> 00:13:16,091
And then, you know, I see a lot of kids,

310
00:13:16,091 --> 00:13:19,291
little buckle fractures,
you know, summertime or monkey bar falls.

311
00:13:19,391 --> 00:13:23,024
They fall and hurt their wrist
and it's just a little buckle fracture.

312
00:13:23,024 --> 00:13:25,090
Their bones don't crack like adults do.

313
00:13:25,090 --> 00:13:26,756
They just bend a little bit.

314
00:13:26,756 --> 00:13:27,890
I hate it when they get hurt,

315
00:13:27,890 --> 00:13:30,189
but they're easy to take care of
because they heal well.

316
00:13:30,189 --> 00:13:34,489
So we can get them in, get them in
a splint, in the cast for just a few weeks,

317
00:13:34,555 --> 00:13:37,088
and then they're back
and they can play sports in the cast.

318
00:13:37,088 --> 00:13:38,955
You know, it's a little wrist fracture.

319
00:13:38,955 --> 00:13:42,021
As long as we pad it up,
we let people play football and baseball,

320
00:13:42,021 --> 00:13:42,954
whatever, as long as they can

321
00:13:42,954 --> 00:13:46,754
kind of tolerate it and pad the cast
so they don't hurt somebody else.

322
00:13:46,820 --> 00:13:50,320
So that's a common thing we see
is the little buckle fractures in the wrist.

323
00:13:50,353 --> 00:13:52,020
Yeah. Okay.

324
00:13:52,020 --> 00:13:54,653
Well, this next question I want to just
direct to Doctor Smathers for a second.

325
00:13:54,653 --> 00:13:58,252
You mentioned you had another career before medicine.

326
00:13:58,352 --> 00:13:59,619
Can you tell us a little bit about that.

327
00:13:59,619 --> 00:14:02,118
Yes, more than one, probably. Okay.

328
00:14:02,118 --> 00:14:05,584
You know, I mean,
I did undergrad in pre-med, zoology,

329
00:14:05,651 --> 00:14:08,351
knew I wanted to go to medical school
or be in the medical field somehow.

330
00:14:08,351 --> 00:14:09,451
But I was an athlete as well.

331
00:14:09,451 --> 00:14:14,617
So when I finished my undergrad, I looked
at grad school and exercise science.

332
00:14:14,617 --> 00:14:17,650
I stayed at the Health and Exercise
Science department at O.U.

333
00:14:17,650 --> 00:14:23,182
And I had started racing bicycles
at a young age, about age 12.

334
00:14:23,282 --> 00:14:24,749
And I

335
00:14:24,849 --> 00:14:26,015
went all the way through high

336
00:14:26,015 --> 00:14:29,215
school racing and I played football
and some things like that.

337
00:14:29,215 --> 00:14:31,514
And then I stopped for a while
to go to undergrad.

338
00:14:31,514 --> 00:14:34,614
But when I got into grad school,
I was in exercise science and physiology.

339
00:14:34,614 --> 00:14:38,347
I kind of got back into cycling
and ended up turning pro

340
00:14:38,413 --> 00:14:41,246
and racing for several years
until I got injured.

341
00:14:41,246 --> 00:14:44,246
That was one of the reasons
I went into sports medicine.

342
00:14:44,279 --> 00:14:48,179
I worked, I was a grad assistant
for six years and I was an adjunct at O.U.

343
00:14:48,179 --> 00:14:48,779
For a while.

344
00:14:48,779 --> 00:14:50,212
So I was a professor.

345
00:14:50,212 --> 00:14:54,145
Then I was in orthopedics doing research
and hip arthroscopy and things like that.

346
00:14:54,145 --> 00:14:57,011
So things just kind of fell into place

347
00:14:57,011 --> 00:14:57,677
to do that.

348
00:14:57,677 --> 00:15:00,544
So those are the many careers
really. Right?

349
00:15:00,544 --> 00:15:03,010
And then I eventually got to the point
that I decided

350
00:15:03,010 --> 00:15:04,943
research
wasn't exactly what I wanted to do.

351
00:15:04,943 --> 00:15:07,143
I really wanted to take care of people

352
00:15:07,143 --> 00:15:09,576
versus write
the research behind taking care of people.

353
00:15:09,576 --> 00:15:15,342
So I worked hard to apply to med school
and and kept reapplying till I got in.

354
00:15:15,342 --> 00:15:18,941
And and then I joined
you guys in your class.

355
00:15:18,941 --> 00:15:20,308
So, of course.

356
00:15:20,308 --> 00:15:22,741
It was
it was tough to get in, but, you know.

357
00:15:22,741 --> 00:15:23,807
We're glad you were there.

358
00:15:23,807 --> 00:15:27,173
But yeah, yeah, I don't think I
don't think I knew you were a pro athlete.

359
00:15:27,307 --> 00:15:30,006
Yeah. Yeah.
I don't think any one of us, maybe some.

360
00:15:30,006 --> 00:15:31,373
That's amazing.

361
00:15:31,373 --> 00:15:33,206
We knew, but none of us knew that.
We like that.

362
00:15:33,206 --> 00:15:36,305
I feel like that's something you would have shared a lot more of that.

363
00:15:36,405 --> 00:15:38,172
Why didn't you? I mean.

364
00:15:38,172 --> 00:15:42,005
People would ask, you know,
what I'd done, but, um, it just depends.

365
00:15:42,005 --> 00:15:43,305
You know, sometimes I'd let them know.

366
00:15:43,305 --> 00:15:46,304
But we actually were based out of Norman
for the most part.

367
00:15:46,337 --> 00:15:47,204
We had a.

368
00:15:47,204 --> 00:15:50,370
Core group of guys that and being here
centrally located

369
00:15:50,370 --> 00:15:53,470
in the United States, we could travel
anywhere in any of the coasts.

370
00:15:53,470 --> 00:15:54,803
So we traveled.

371
00:15:54,803 --> 00:15:56,569
I think I've been to 37 states.

372
00:15:56,569 --> 00:15:59,802
I've been out of the country
into Mexico, Dominican Republic, Canada.

373
00:16:00,069 --> 00:16:02,402
And you get to ride
and all these terrains?

374
00:16:02,402 --> 00:16:03,402
Yeah, San Francisco, New York, Philadelphia.

375
00:16:03,402 --> 00:16:05,701
And, you know. I bet that was nice.

376
00:16:05,701 --> 00:16:07,535
Lots of different places that we travel.

377
00:16:07,535 --> 00:16:10,701
And so I kind of started
traveling early on in life,

378
00:16:10,701 --> 00:16:14,600
and I think that opened a lot of doors
for me.

379
00:16:14,667 --> 00:16:16,600
But still,
I see people from the cycling world

380
00:16:16,600 --> 00:16:20,566
that I've met 20 years ago
and still keep in touch with.

381
00:16:20,566 --> 00:16:22,699
So yeah, that's a pretty cool life.

382
00:16:22,699 --> 00:16:26,465
You know, I didn’t get rich but

383
00:16:26,532 --> 00:16:27,698
amazing experiences.

384
00:16:27,698 --> 00:16:30,331
Yeah. Yeah. It opened a lot of doors for me.

385
00:16:30,331 --> 00:16:31,631
Wow. That was really.

386
00:16:31,631 --> 00:16:32,898
Yeah.

387
00:16:32,898 --> 00:16:35,631
Yeah.

388
00:16:35,631 --> 00:16:36,831
Well.

389
00:16:36,831 --> 00:16:38,264
This is kind of a question for Doctor
Jennings.

390
00:16:38,264 --> 00:16:39,864
One of the things that we most
commonly see

391
00:16:39,864 --> 00:16:42,097
in the primary care
perspective are hernias.

392
00:16:42,097 --> 00:16:44,130
Now, I know
there's a lot of different ones,

393
00:16:44,130 --> 00:16:46,929
but different types of hernias,
But yeah, one of the ones

394
00:16:46,929 --> 00:16:51,229
that we've been seeing more and more is
is umbilical or abdominal hernias.

395
00:16:51,329 --> 00:16:54,628
Would you be able to kind of just explain,
um, you know,

396
00:16:54,728 --> 00:16:58,661
what are some of the complications,
uh, if patients tend to ignore them?

397
00:16:58,761 --> 00:16:59,627
Mm hmm.

398
00:16:59,627 --> 00:17:03,660
So typically I tell people when you
get hernias it's and the first question

399
00:17:03,760 --> 00:17:05,793
everyone always has,
what did I do to get this?

400
00:17:05,793 --> 00:17:08,093
But it's actually something
that you're usually born with.

401
00:17:08,093 --> 00:17:10,526
So that's the first thing
I do, is reassure people

402
00:17:10,526 --> 00:17:11,593
that it's not really something

403
00:17:11,593 --> 00:17:14,892
that they did to cause
like an umbilical or inguinal hernia.

404
00:17:14,959 --> 00:17:17,892
There are other types of abdominal hernias
you can get after surgery,

405
00:17:17,892 --> 00:17:21,025
which is typically sometimes a cause
from the previous surgery.

406
00:17:21,025 --> 00:17:26,391
But the biggest thing to watch out for,
you know, usually if hernias are reducible

407
00:17:26,391 --> 00:17:26,924
or small,

408
00:17:26,924 --> 00:17:31,223
which just means you can push them
back down and below your abdominal wall,

409
00:17:31,323 --> 00:17:32,990
because I explain it to people,
there's skin,

410
00:17:32,990 --> 00:17:35,989
fat and muscle and a hernia
is a hole in the muscle layer.

411
00:17:35,989 --> 00:17:39,855
So if you can push things back down
below the muscle layer, usually it's fine.

412
00:17:39,855 --> 00:17:42,488
But what I tell them is
hernias are never going to go away.

413
00:17:42,488 --> 00:17:44,521
They don't ever
just spontaneously resolve.

414
00:17:44,521 --> 00:17:46,754
So typically they get a little bit bigger

415
00:17:46,754 --> 00:17:50,621
over time just with the activity in life
and and things like that.

416
00:17:50,621 --> 00:17:52,287
So that's the biggest thing.

417
00:17:52,287 --> 00:17:55,153
Whenever it if it ever does pop out
and you're not able to push it back

418
00:17:55,153 --> 00:17:56,420
in, that's when it becomes

419
00:17:56,420 --> 00:18:02,319
more of an emergency that you need to get
it checked out and get it fixed.

420
00:18:02,386 --> 00:18:03,119
Yeah, I've already

421
00:18:03,119 --> 00:18:06,785
sent Doctor Jennings so many hernia repairs.

422
00:18:06,852 --> 00:18:09,485
And I think I've sent quite a few,
uh, gallbladder removals

423
00:18:09,485 --> 00:18:10,518
over your way too so.

424
00:18:10,518 --> 00:18:13,517
So, um, so.

425
00:18:13,651 --> 00:18:17,250
Um, just going back to the whole

426
00:18:17,350 --> 00:18:21,050
med school thing, um, you guys again,

427
00:18:21,183 --> 00:18:24,616
I think we should give a shout out
to some of our old professors.

428
00:18:24,616 --> 00:18:28,549
And yes, I remember somebody
that you really enjoyed working with or.

429
00:18:28,615 --> 00:18:31,382
Well, I mean mine I guess was O'Donohue.

430
00:18:31,382 --> 00:18:33,581
Yeah. Oh, it's such.
A great teacher. Yeah.

431
00:18:33,581 --> 00:18:36,581
Like the amount of time
that he spent trying

432
00:18:36,581 --> 00:18:40,447
to teach us and investing in students
was pretty amazing.

433
00:18:40,447 --> 00:18:41,080
And like,

434
00:18:41,080 --> 00:18:44,247
I don't think I ever really had a one
on one conversation with him probably.

435
00:18:44,247 --> 00:18:45,946
So no chance he would remember me.

436
00:18:45,946 --> 00:18:49,446
But I know he definitely
had an impact on my life. So

437
00:18:49,546 --> 00:18:53,112
but I think for me it was
it was anatomy, but it was actually.

438
00:18:53,112 --> 00:18:55,778
Dr. Holloway Mm hmm. Yeah.

439
00:18:55,778 --> 00:18:57,811
So O'Donohue
was one of the other anatomists.

440
00:18:57,811 --> 00:19:02,111
It was the other anatomy professor
that I actually bothered quite a bit.

441
00:19:02,111 --> 00:19:04,211
And I really do owe a lot.

442
00:19:04,211 --> 00:19:07,377
You know, anatomy was a struggle
being thrown into it.

443
00:19:07,377 --> 00:19:11,543
And, uh, in the first few weeks, uh, but,
but I really do appreciate Dr.

444
00:19:11,543 --> 00:19:12,809
O'Donohue and also Dr.

445
00:19:12,809 --> 00:19:17,642
Holloway, um, you know, for,
for helping us all in that struggle.

446
00:19:17,642 --> 00:19:20,742
So for listeners that don't know, like,
it's like one of your first classes in

447
00:19:20,742 --> 00:19:24,841
med school and you're just thrown into it
and, uh, it's a hard class.

448
00:19:24,941 --> 00:19:25,841
It's a hard class.

449
00:19:25,841 --> 00:19:28,207
You know, I remember
staying up until midnight one day.

450
00:19:28,207 --> 00:19:32,307
I think down in the cadaver lab
and and just trying to go over everything

451
00:19:32,307 --> 00:19:32,940
one after another.

452
00:19:32,940 --> 00:19:34,606
And also probably pulled a, did I? 

453
00:19:34,606 --> 00:19:37,106
Yeah, I think I pulled an all nighter
once for one of the tests,

454
00:19:37,106 --> 00:19:39,506
never doing that again
and never did that again. But still.

455
00:19:39,506 --> 00:19:42,505
Yeah but no
it's it's it's a tough class, but

456
00:19:42,505 --> 00:19:46,371
you learn a lot and you know, it's it's
a rewarding experience though.

457
00:19:46,371 --> 00:19:47,138
It really is.

458
00:19:47,138 --> 00:19:48,505
So yeah it's actually crazy.

459
00:19:48,505 --> 00:19:51,037
Um, one of our TAs there was Dr.

460
00:19:51,037 --> 00:19:54,370
Catherine Klump, and Dr. Smathers and I both

461
00:19:54,370 --> 00:19:57,703
had the privilege of working with her
and our family medicine training too.

462
00:19:57,703 --> 00:19:59,436
And so she's wonderful.

463
00:19:59,436 --> 00:20:02,436
Shout out to Dr. O'Donohue and everyone.

464
00:20:02,469 --> 00:20:03,536
Absolutely. Yes.

465
00:20:03,536 --> 00:20:05,102
Smathers do you have anybody else
you want to?

466
00:20:05,102 --> 00:20:08,835
You know, I think O'Don definitely hit
all of us because he was just

467
00:20:08,902 --> 00:20:11,868
he pushed us hard,
but he also was there to take care of us

468
00:20:11,868 --> 00:20:13,701
and make sure we learned
what we needed to learn.

469
00:20:13,701 --> 00:20:15,901
That's that's what I thought was a great
you know,

470
00:20:15,901 --> 00:20:18,934
I remember
neurology was just pounded into us.

471
00:20:18,934 --> 00:20:22,767
They had a way of just making sure you
learn what you needed to learn as well.

472
00:20:22,767 --> 00:20:24,400
So that is always stuck with me.

473
00:20:24,400 --> 00:20:28,932
And and even to this day, you know, I,
I still get some neurology stuff in

474
00:20:29,032 --> 00:20:29,999
the clinic.

475
00:20:29,999 --> 00:20:31,865
Okay. I think I remember this now.

476
00:20:31,865 --> 00:20:33,532
Or I go back to it and,

477
00:20:33,532 --> 00:20:37,565
um, all the neurology professors 
were part of that as well.

478
00:20:37,631 --> 00:20:38,731
We would never forget.

479
00:20:38,731 --> 00:20:41,897
Dr. Gordon You know, the ol' G.
Time is brain.

480
00:20:42,131 --> 00:20:42,897
Yeah. Yes.

481
00:20:42,897 --> 00:20:47,463
Save the penumbra. Yeah. That's right. So

482
00:20:47,530 --> 00:20:48,596
never forget, never forget.

483
00:20:48,596 --> 00:20:51,329
That was an effective way to. To teach us.

484
00:20:51,329 --> 00:20:52,629
Yeah. Um.

485
00:20:52,629 --> 00:20:54,262
Um, you know, Dr.

486
00:20:54,262 --> 00:20:55,895
Blair was, was one of that.

487
00:20:55,895 --> 00:20:57,029
Oh, yeah, Yeah.

488
00:20:57,029 --> 00:20:59,861
I mean, he was so passionate,
I think, about teaching us.

489
00:20:59,861 --> 00:21:01,761
He really was. Yeah. Um.

490
00:21:01,761 --> 00:21:04,061
You know, to come back.
There's so many. It's so fast.

491
00:21:04,061 --> 00:21:07,960
But yeah, now it's kind of a blur
after the last decade.

492
00:21:08,127 --> 00:21:11,027
So I feel like when you're in it,
it seems like it's going so slow.

493
00:21:11,027 --> 00:21:14,793
But now, like, look back after undergrad,
it's like 13 years later.

494
00:21:14,926 --> 00:21:15,759
Yeah, I think it.

495
00:21:15,759 --> 00:21:19,525
Went by in the blink of an eye, but,
you know, so I, I think that's,

496
00:21:19,525 --> 00:21:22,525
I enjoyed a lot of it. So

497
00:21:22,692 --> 00:21:25,825
and one of my favorite lectures, I'm
not sure if you guys remember this was Dr.

498
00:21:25,825 --> 00:21:29,924
Chung, the,
uh, the author of BRS Anatomy.

499
00:21:29,924 --> 00:21:31,957
Yeah. It was, uh, somewhat inappropriate.

500
00:21:31,957 --> 00:21:35,490
And I think that's why I was very, very,
very an unforgettable lecture.

501
00:21:35,523 --> 00:21:39,356
And so but, and unfortunately,
he had passed away

502
00:21:39,456 --> 00:21:43,689
just a year or two after, um,
you know, after after that lecture.

503
00:21:43,689 --> 00:21:48,288
But, but, that was actually
a pretty unforgettable lecture. So.

504
00:21:48,355 --> 00:21:49,821
Yeah.

505
00:21:49,821 --> 00:21:53,154
Yeah, it's 20, 2013.

506
00:21:53,154 --> 00:21:55,287
When we started, right, Yeah.

507
00:21:55,287 --> 00:21:57,254
It's been ten years, a whole decade.

508
00:21:57,254 --> 00:22:00,986
So this is, this is,
this is like our, you know.

509
00:22:01,086 --> 00:22:02,953
Ten year reunion. Ten year reunion party.

510
00:22:02,953 --> 00:22:03,519
Yeah.

511
00:22:03,519 --> 00:22:06,152
If only we had more people from our class
working at.

512
00:22:06,152 --> 00:22:07,019
Norman Regional.

513
00:22:07,019 --> 00:22:08,852
We could invite them. We'll keep working on it.

514
00:22:08,852 --> 00:22:10,285
Yeah.

515
00:22:10,285 --> 00:22:11,052
Keep recruiting more

516
00:22:11,052 --> 00:22:13,118
people. Definitely, definitely.

517
00:22:13,118 --> 00:22:16,118
Um, one thing we were wondering was was

518
00:22:16,184 --> 00:22:20,484
is there anything that, uh, that you guys
can you guys expect from,

519
00:22:20,717 --> 00:22:24,550
from a primary care perspective,
what we can do to make your lives easier

520
00:22:24,783 --> 00:22:28,883
and whether it comes to general surgery
or sports medicine?

521
00:22:28,983 --> 00:22:30,582
I mean, I think one of the biggest things

522
00:22:30,582 --> 00:22:33,682
that I appreciate from you guys
is you just reach out.

523
00:22:33,682 --> 00:22:35,215
If you have a question about something, it

524
00:22:35,215 --> 00:22:37,715
it smooths things over so much
rather than if you're

525
00:22:37,715 --> 00:22:39,415
not sure about something
and ask them like,

526
00:22:39,415 --> 00:22:42,248
hey, what imaging would you want
before I send them to see in clinic?

527
00:22:42,248 --> 00:22:46,147
I think communication, which, you know,
we learned all throughout medical school

528
00:22:46,147 --> 00:22:47,080
is the biggest thing.

529
00:22:47,080 --> 00:22:51,446
And, you know, we communicate on
probably a weekly basis at least so

530
00:22:51,546 --> 00:22:54,579
and I don't I don't hesitate to reach out
and ask you guys questions

531
00:22:54,579 --> 00:22:58,879
if I have the same thing.
So that is probably the biggest thing.

532
00:22:58,979 --> 00:22:59,845
Yeah, I would agree.

533
00:22:59,845 --> 00:23:02,611
I mean, I think a warm handoff is nice.

534
00:23:02,611 --> 00:23:06,544
It and it's nice, you know, what's
coming at you know what to think about.

535
00:23:06,611 --> 00:23:09,377
But I think the patient really
it reflects on the patient

536
00:23:09,377 --> 00:23:12,377
is in the patient and goes okay
this guy actually reached out and talked

537
00:23:12,377 --> 00:23:15,376
to this provider they're sending me to
versus just sending me cold. 

538
00:23:15,476 --> 00:23:16,943
You're trying to figure out
everything is Yeah.

539
00:23:16,943 --> 00:23:19,876
You know, Dr. Vedala sent you to me
because you've got this going on.

540
00:23:19,876 --> 00:23:23,509
And I think that really helps the patient

541
00:23:23,575 --> 00:23:27,075
feel more comfortable and feel like
they're really being listened to.

542
00:23:27,108 --> 00:23:27,375
Yeah.

543
00:23:27,375 --> 00:23:30,441
Versus just being pushed into a clinic
or sent to somebody

544
00:23:30,441 --> 00:23:32,341
to figure out a problem
that can't be figured out.

545
00:23:32,341 --> 00:23:34,207
So yeah, I think that's a great point.

546
00:23:34,207 --> 00:23:37,007
Just walking into a room and saying, Hey,
already talked to Dr.

547
00:23:37,007 --> 00:23:40,273
Vedala, and they kind of gave me a little
bit of an idea about what's going on.

548
00:23:40,273 --> 00:23:43,173
And so people really open up after that
and makes

549
00:23:43,173 --> 00:23:46,305
makes it easier to get information and
kind of figure out what's really going on.

550
00:23:46,305 --> 00:23:48,039
I think from that standpoint.

551
00:23:48,039 --> 00:23:50,172
Yeah,
and we've said this time and time again,

552
00:23:50,172 --> 00:23:53,338
but I think, you know,
like a recurring theme we've seen in our

553
00:23:53,471 --> 00:23:56,471
in our episodes so far
is that communication is key

554
00:23:56,504 --> 00:23:59,370
and how Norman Regional makes that easy
for us through

555
00:23:59,370 --> 00:24:02,537
applications like Tiger Text
and everyone's so approachable.

556
00:24:02,537 --> 00:24:05,236
And so we appreciate both of you guys for,

557
00:24:05,236 --> 00:24:08,103
for being so open
and in answering our questions.

558
00:24:08,103 --> 00:24:10,336
I mean that gallbladder question
Thank you so much.

559
00:24:10,336 --> 00:24:12,302
For helping us.

560
00:24:12,369 --> 00:24:14,868
This seems huge.

561
00:24:14,868 --> 00:24:16,368
And of course Dr. Smathers.

562
00:24:16,368 --> 00:24:17,501
Thank you for all of the,

563
00:24:17,501 --> 00:24:20,501
uh, the knee injections that you always do
for all of our patients.

564
00:24:20,501 --> 00:24:22,934
Uh, it makes a huge difference.

565
00:24:22,934 --> 00:24:25,933
And that really is appreciated
because I'm not, I'm not I'm

566
00:24:25,933 --> 00:24:28,300
not inclined to do a whole lot of knee
injections personally myself.

567
00:24:28,300 --> 00:24:31,733
So, yeah, makes it easier. So

568
00:24:31,799 --> 00:24:35,432
So do you go to any games or like cover
like high school teams or anything?

569
00:24:35,432 --> 00:24:37,565
So yeah, I cover Newcastle High School.

570
00:24:37,565 --> 00:24:39,065
Their sidelines.

571
00:24:39,065 --> 00:24:41,731
If they're out of town
and Tuttle's in town, I'll cover

572
00:24:41,731 --> 00:24:43,731
Tuttle since I'm out and Tri City.

573
00:24:43,731 --> 00:24:45,297
Okay I see

574
00:24:45,297 --> 00:24:47,697
Blanchard, Tuttle, Newcastle people,

575
00:24:47,697 --> 00:24:51,197
Norman some, a little bit of southwest
side of Moore, some Mustang people.

576
00:24:51,197 --> 00:24:52,463
Chickasha.

577
00:24:52,463 --> 00:24:56,163
So I try to make sure I'm available
for those teams and it helps.

578
00:24:56,163 --> 00:25:00,762
I've been with Newcastle now
going on three years. Wow.

579
00:25:00,762 --> 00:25:03,295
And so you kind of, you know,

580
00:25:03,295 --> 00:25:05,128
they come in, bring their kids
and I said, Yeah,

581
00:25:05,128 --> 00:25:07,394
I'm done on the sidelines for football,
you know.

582
00:25:07,394 --> 00:25:09,294
So I say, Hi if you need something.

583
00:25:09,294 --> 00:25:11,127
Yeah, that's
why I've found so interesting.

584
00:25:11,127 --> 00:25:12,960
Like there's
so many people that will come to Norman,

585
00:25:12,960 --> 00:25:15,260
they're like, Happy to be here.
They're like, I'm not going to the city.

586
00:25:15,260 --> 00:25:16,793
I'm not going 20 more minutes.

587
00:25:16,793 --> 00:25:18,026
And they're like, Happy to be here.

588
00:25:18,026 --> 00:25:22,059
So I didn't realize that that was such
a thing for Norman to they catch all.

589
00:25:22,059 --> 00:25:23,259
The surrounding area.

590
00:25:23,259 --> 00:25:24,026
Yeah, yeah.

591
00:25:24,026 --> 00:25:27,158
It's pretty small town, you know, Jason
White was from Tuttle, and back

592
00:25:27,158 --> 00:25:31,025
then we thought of it as a small town, but
really now it's just part of the metro.

593
00:25:31,025 --> 00:25:33,958
Which is. Yeah, yeah. My dude

594
00:25:34,024 --> 00:25:34,657
coming back from

595
00:25:34,657 --> 00:25:38,790
Vegas and our plane back from Vegas
was the Tuttle wrestling team.

596
00:25:38,890 --> 00:25:39,890
So we sat next

597
00:25:39,890 --> 00:25:41,590
to all these kids. Recently?

598
00:25:41,590 --> 00:25:43,656
Yeah. Did they, like,
go to a championship?

599
00:25:43,656 --> 00:25:45,623
There was some type of tournament
out there. Oh, yeah.

600
00:25:45,623 --> 00:25:48,122
People were like, clapping for him
and all like, this is great.

601
00:25:48,122 --> 00:25:50,089
Yeah. With Tuttle shirts on.

602
00:25:50,089 --> 00:25:52,622
Tuttle wrestling is no joke. Really. Yeah.

603
00:25:52,622 --> 00:25:58,288
They usually win state and I think they've been,
I mean, over 15, 16, 17 years.

604
00:25:58,288 --> 00:26:01,054
They've been to state every year. Yeah,
they usually win it.

605
00:26:01,054 --> 00:26:02,054
Like 5A or 6A? 

606
00:26:02,054 --> 00:26:04,953
Uh they are 5A. 

607
00:26:04,953 --> 00:26:06,453
Those kids were so nice too, like.

608
00:26:06,453 --> 00:26:09,053=
I can never remember you know which class.

609
00:26:09,053 --> 00:26:12,019
There's, it's always moving up
Yeah yeah Tuttle is no joke

610
00:26:12,019 --> 00:26:15,519
for wrestling and they take their sports
very serious out there.

611
00:26:15,519 --> 00:26:17,885
Yeah that's their
they're big thing so you know.

612
00:26:17,885 --> 00:26:20,385
And you know, I was going to talk
on your knee injections.

613
00:26:20,385 --> 00:26:22,351
You know, that's an easy thing that we do.

614
00:26:22,351 --> 00:26:24,417
I use ultrasound to guide the injections.

615
00:26:24,417 --> 00:26:25,517
So yeah.

616
00:26:25,517 --> 00:26:27,950
I mean, that's a simple procedure
to get over to me.

617
00:26:27,950 --> 00:26:29,350
I use ultrasound.

618
00:26:29,350 --> 00:26:30,750
You know,
if people have fluid on their knee,

619
00:26:30,750 --> 00:26:34,416
I drain it off and then put a steroid in
or put gel injections

620
00:26:34,516 --> 00:26:37,016
to help them kind of keep them active.
Just the main thing.

621
00:26:37,016 --> 00:26:38,715
I try to keep them away from my surgeons.

622
00:26:38,715 --> 00:26:40,182
If I can help it. Yeah.

623
00:26:40,182 --> 00:26:41,982
Get to the point, say,
okay, nothing's helping,

624
00:26:41,982 --> 00:26:43,848
maybe
you need to talk to my surgeons, but,

625
00:26:43,848 --> 00:26:47,014
you know, they always ask like, when do
I need to get a knee replacement or hip?

626
00:26:47,014 --> 00:26:50,714
And I say, you know, it's when you're
tired of me poking you with needles.

627
00:26:50,714 --> 00:26:51,614
We've tried everything.

628
00:26:51,614 --> 00:26:52,813
You can't sleep at night.

629
00:26:52,813 --> 00:26:54,813
It's affecting your health.
You're getting unhealthy.

630
00:26:54,813 --> 00:26:57,646
That's the time to get your joint
replaced.

631
00:26:57,646 --> 00:27:00,512
Yeah, and keep your health, man.

632
00:27:00,512 --> 00:27:02,412
And Joint replacement is not an easy task.

633
00:27:02,412 --> 00:27:03,579
With the rehab, Right?

634
00:27:03,579 --> 00:27:06,345
So right before and after.

635
00:27:06,345 --> 00:27:09,078
And that's a nice thing with my partners
and my surgeons.

636
00:27:09,078 --> 00:27:10,844
They're very conservative guys.

637
00:27:10,844 --> 00:27:14,877
They'll send people to me to do
conservative therapy prior to a surgery.

638
00:27:14,944 --> 00:27:16,110
Um, just.

639
00:27:16,110 --> 00:27:19,043
It's nice having guys that are,
you know, conservative

640
00:27:19,043 --> 00:27:22,243
minded and good at surgery as well. Hmm.

641
00:27:22,309 --> 00:27:25,009
We have, uh, the very amazing Dr.

642
00:27:25,009 --> 00:27:27,542
James Bond, at Norman Regional. Yeah

643
00:27:27,542 --> 00:27:30,408
He is my ortho,
and he told me to do therapy.

644
00:27:30,408 --> 00:27:31,841
Yeah. Yeah.

645
00:27:31,841 --> 00:27:34,075
Well, I. Mm.

646
00:27:34,075 --> 00:27:37,041
I have bad knees. Oh, boy. Yeah.

647
00:27:37,041 --> 00:27:39,674
For all the listeners out there,
I have bad knees.

648
00:27:39,674 --> 00:27:43,973
I'm pretty sure I do too,
I just haven't really got myself chekced out.

649
00:27:44,040 --> 00:27:45,640
Not there yet.

650
00:27:45,640 --> 00:27:47,506
It started when I tried CrossFit.

651
00:27:47,506 --> 00:27:48,839
It's a terrible idea.

652
00:27:48,839 --> 00:27:51,705
CrossFit has kept orthopedics going.

653
00:27:51,705 --> 00:27:52,305
Yeah, that's what he said.

654
00:27:52,305 --> 00:27:55,205
He was like they keep us in business
and I'm like, okay, yeah.

655
00:27:55,205 --> 00:27:58,071
I try to tell my brother that,
but he goes to CrossFit all the time.

656
00:27:58,071 --> 00:28:02,104
Oh man.

657
00:28:02,204 --> 00:28:03,071
Well,

658
00:28:03,071 --> 00:28:06,070
you guys got anything else
you want to say to our listeners?

659
00:28:06,237 --> 00:28:08,070
I think that's pretty good.

660
00:28:08,070 --> 00:28:08,836
Okay.

661
00:28:08,836 --> 00:28:12,703
Unless there's any other questions
you got or anything else we need to cover?

662
00:28:12,803 --> 00:28:13,702
Let's see here

663
00:28:13,702 --> 00:28:15,436
You know,
we kind of kind of covered everything.

664
00:28:15,436 --> 00:28:16,635
Yeah, yeah.

665
00:28:16,635 --> 00:28:19,068
Everything that we wanted to cover. Uh,
I think that's everything.

666
00:28:19,068 --> 00:28:21,101
And we really appreciate

667
00:28:21,101 --> 00:28:21,501
you both

668
00:28:21,501 --> 00:28:24,534
taking the time out of your busy days
to come talk to us and our listeners.

669
00:28:24,534 --> 00:28:27,867
And, uh, you're both invaluable
resources for us,

670
00:28:27,867 --> 00:28:31,067
and we can't thank you enough
for helping us take care of our patients.

671
00:28:31,067 --> 00:28:32,967
And, uh, for our listeners out there,

672
00:28:32,967 --> 00:28:36,099
Dr. Jay Jennings
and Dr. Aaron Smathers guys here,

673
00:28:36,166 --> 00:28:37,066
surgery and

674
00:28:37,066 --> 00:28:40,066
sports medicine, uh, extraordinaires.

675
00:28:40,099 --> 00:28:41,565
And we love these guys here.

676
00:28:41,565 --> 00:28:46,498
And so, um, thank you for our listeners
for taking the time to tune in.

677
00:28:46,498 --> 00:28:49,364
And as always, stay classy, my friends.

678
00:28:49,364 --> 00:28:50,431
And stay out of trouble.